• Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint

The Nature of max Lighting

Before you roll up your sleeves and start getting pixels under your fingernails, take a moment to think about how lighting in max works. If you have experience working with photographic lighting, you might have noticed that things work somewhat differently in the max universe. Although it uses a real-world studio as a paradigm, on closer inspection, the max world can be quite unnatural. In some cases that’s a good thing. You have control over things that would be impractical or downright impossible in the real world. Unfortunately, there are many properties of light in nature that we take for granted but that are lacking from max lights. Often it takes some wrangling with max’s more esoteric features to coax out a visually realistic image.

For instance, a subject can be adequately (if not attractively) lit by a single bare bulb in the real world. Light bounces off the walls, ceiling, and floor and illuminates the subject from all directions. Lights in max don’t bounce. To simulate the real-world effect of surfaces lighting each other in max, you have to use several strategically placed lights. You might even have to use techniques such as light falloff or negative lights (like little black holes) to emulate the complex interactions of intersurface illumination and shading. Your best guide for this sort of thing is reference. Look at photographs of similar scenes and study them to see what makes real-world lighting look the way it does. Where two walls meet do they look brighter, darker, or unchanged? Notice colors. Does the color of a wall stay consistent across its entire surface? Probably not.


PREVIEW

                                                                          

Not a subscriber?

Start A Free Trial


  
  • Creative Edge
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint