• Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint
Share this Page URL
Help

Chapter 12. Creating Lights

Chapter 12. Creating Lights

Light and shadow are essential to the three-dimensional, realistic quality of a scene. Lighting is a crucial element to setting the mood and feeling of a scene. Too much light can flatten out a scene, leaving the viewer unengaged and uninterested in the imagery. Just the right amount of light intensity and thoughtful placement can draw the eye around the scene. You can use lights to focus a viewer's attention on a particular place in your scene (Figure 12.1) or on an object you don't want the viewer to miss (Figure 12.2). Light can be used to draw spectators into the scene as if they were participants, or to leave them feeling like onlookers, outside the action.

Figure 12.1. Adding an area of focus strengthens the scene.


Figure 12.2. An object can be accented through the correct use of light.


Artists for centuries have used lighting to invoke emotion in their paintings through the use of chiaroscuro, the play of light and dark, which draws the viewer into the painting. Leonardo da Vinci; Gerrit Van Honthorst; and the master of painting with light, Caravaggio, all experimented with light in their paintings. More recently, we've seen many filmmakers use similar techniques in their movies; Blade Runner, The Godfather, and Poltergeist are all great examples. As the movies unfold, the action is supported with lighting through various colors, intensity, and placement.

Controlling light can often be tricky and time consuming. In this chapter we'll look at some of the attributes and techniques used to control lights in a Maya scene.


PREVIEW

                                                                          

Not a subscriber?

Start A Free Trial


  
  • Creative Edge
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint