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Chapter 15. Rendering

Chapter 15. Rendering

For thousands of years, artists have been drawing pictures. Starting with only a line, artists learned how to apply shading to form and color to light. After many centuries, they learned how to draw perspective: parallel perspective in the East, converging perspective in the West. Finally, in the twenty-first century, we are creating pictures out of our imaginations, using tools and media that could never have been foreseen. With 3ds max 4, artists can draw, paint, sculpt, and animate, and let the computer do the shading and perspective. For the first time, artists are working in a medium of light, moving bits of color and transparency and depth information through data channels and onto their screens. From the desktop to books, television, movies, and the Internet (not to mention new forms of multimedia production not even yet imagined), 3D graphics are here to stay.

This chapter shows you how to take the scenes you have created in your computer and send them out into the world. The basics of rendering still images are covered in Chapter 11, Lights. This chapter picks up where that explanation leaves off, and demonstrates how to set image output size, how to render images to different types of file formats, how to render animations, and how to create atmospheric and post-process effects (Figure 15.1).


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