• Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint
Share this Page URL
Help

Chapter 3. Principles of Animation > Principles of Animation Applied to the Web

Principles of Animation Applied to the Web

The principles described in John Lasseter's article are to animation what Strunk and White's The Elements of Style is to writing; they apply to all animation—even on the Web. If the Web makes control of timing difficult, that is no excuse to ignore timing—it simply becomes a hurdle to overcome on the way to providing compelling animation on the Internet. You can still squash and stretch characters, even at the lowest bandwidths, by using the crudest digital animation tools.

Squash and Stretch on the Web

Consider an elephant seal. This huge animal is largely made of gelatinous blubber wrapped around a thin, muscular skeleton. In the water, the elephant seal is a streamlined swimmer, capable of migrating thousands of miles each season and of chasing and catching fast-moving fish. When the seal lumbers onto land, it can scarcely move under its own weight. Waves ripple through its flabby body as it writhes its way onto the rocks, and when it finally settles under the sun, it melts over the rocks like a huge puddle of chocolate. In the water, the animal stretches out into a graceful form, its mass buoyed by seawater; on land, it squashes completely, its soft blubber spreading under its weight.


PREVIEW

                                                                          

Not a subscriber?

Start A Free Trial


  
  • Creative Edge
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint